Mulhem Khogeer_Thesis Abstract

Choreographing Hajj

An integral tradition within the annual pilgrimage to Mecca — Hajj — is the acknowledgement that every Muslim is equal no matter their socio-economic status. However, a closer examination of the day-to-day activities of these pilgrims, three million of whom amass in the nearby town of Mina over the course of five days, reveals the extreme range of diversity in activities between these various populations. The generic, standardized empty cube tents designed to support these activities is an over-simplified, “mute”, architectural infrastructure. How could it or should it adapt to the fluctuations of pilgrim’s behavior and activities? Can Mina evolve from its current irresponsive form into a culturally oriented, flexible model that supports heterogeneous activities while maintaining the concept of unity? There is a possibility to foster interactions amongst a population that is in fact extremely diverse (socially, ethnically, linguistically, economically, habitually and in many other ways) by leveraging an innovative architectural method that is defined and shaped by the character of its user rather than the traditional use-centric models.

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One thought on “Mulhem Khogeer_Thesis Abstract

  1. While unity is the main principle in Hajj — where all pilgrims are sharing the same belief and have the same objective — we can “surely” predict that they’ll have the same flow and pace and start treating them as one huge undifferentiated mass. But only by zooming-in into individuals and looking at their non-ritual day-to-day activities, are we going to unpack the reality and see how its extremely a volatile Hajj.

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